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New Electric Cars Flood The UK Market

It’s something that the world is waiting for – the big switch to everyone driving electric cars and not using petrol or diesel anymore. However, although the technology exists, people are still taking their time making the switch – even though governments around the world are offering incentives to get people on board.

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For example, the UK government offers a £5000 credit for drivers who are willing to purchase an electric vehicle, and that brings the cost down significantly. The government’s aim is to increase the number of eco car UK drivers, of course.

Added to this, there are now cheaper electric vehicles coming to the UK market. The most popular electric car in the UK so far has been the Nissan Leaf, which has a retail price of £26,000 (including the government grant reduction).

However, Renault is bringing two cheaper electric cars to the UK during 2012. The Fluence will sell from a base level price of £17,500 and the Renault Zoe will be less than £14,000.

The way Renault has managed to so drastically reduce EV prices is by adopting a battery rental scheme. It will cost the driver about £1000 a year, but it means that your battery is guaranteed for life. There will be no worries about battery deterioration or the fact that your car will lose residual value when you want to sell it second-hand. You will own the car, but the battery can always be changed as it is leased to you.

Although these reduced prices are great news for people thinking about buying an electric car, there’s still a concern about the range limitations of EVs. Unlike the hybrid cars produced by manufacturers such as Honda and Toyota which can always be topped up with fuel at any fuel station, the electric vehicles will still have a limited range on each battery charge. This is around 100 miles, and as most drivers only travel about 40 miles a day, it shouldn’t be a problem. However, the fact that you couldn’t go any further than the range limit before needing to recharge still seems to put people off switching to electric vehicles.

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